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A sit down with bassist and composer Melvin Gibbs. Emerging from the fertile New York scene of the early ’80s, he’s worked with a wide ranging roster of artists. He joins us for a talk about rock music, jazz, the George Floyd protests, playing with Sonny Sharrock, and more.

The post Melvin Gibbs :: Transmissions appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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1975’s Hells Angels was the terminal statement. Where the earlier records show ample consideration to the UK’s underground rock scene – Deep Down Heavy and Electric City play like adventurous jazz prog, thrown out of Canterbury for refusing to partake in wry English-isms – Hells Angels trades familiarity for unabashed cosmic impulse.

The post Bob Downes Open Music :: Hell’s Angels appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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You’ve heard Karen Black sing in Five Easy Pieces to Nashville. Now, her real life songs are revealed via the Cass McCombs-assisted Dreaming of You (1971-1976), featuring select studio and demo recording from the ate actor, restored from their original tapes.

The post Karen Black :: Dreaming of You appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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Videodrome. A recurring column plumbing the depths of vintage and contemporary cinema – from cult, exploitation, trash and grindhouse to sci-fi, horror, noir, documentary and beyond.

Now showing: Terry Gilliam’s 1981 fantasy-adventure Time Bandits — the first installment in his “Trilogy Of Imagination” series…

The post Videodrome :: Time Bandits appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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Welcome back to the stacks. It’s Aquarium Drunkard’s Book Club, our recurring column of recent (or not so recent) recommended reading, featuring Matthew Specktor on Los Angeles, Alan Licht’s sprawling interviews, Rosemary Leary, Jeanne Thornton, and more.

The post Aquarium Drunkard Book Club :: Chapter Seven appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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Taking both inspiration and their name from a tune culled from Ian Matthews 1970 lp, Later That Same Year, Sylvie is comprised of Los Angeles friends and musicians Ben Schwab, Sam Burton, and Marina Allen.

The post Sylvie :: Sylvie appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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Few albums have captured the bleak, messy boredom of the pandemic better than the Sleaford Mods’ ‘Spare Ribs’, a collection of jaundiced rants about days at home, politically-motivated ignorance and, as usual, the posing incompetence of Jason Williamson’s musical peers.

We caught up with Willimanson at home to discuss the new record and more.

The post Sleaford Mods :: The Aquarium Drunkard Interview appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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This week on Transmissions: Anika. Best known for her work with Geoff Barrow and Mexico City’s Exploded View, she returns with Change, an album of subtle electronic pop, driving bass lines, and lyrics that veer from quixotic to inspiring. Anika joined us for a discussion about her time as a journalist, the shifting state of reality, and crafting an album amidst a global pandemic.

The post Anika :: Transmissions appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

For more, go to: AquariumDrunkard.com (Source)

Though only ever released in Japan and in sore need of reissue (affordability not being among the virtues of an original copy), Green Line sits easily alongside the most progressive jazz albums of the early 70s, many of which featured the work of the quartet’s alumni—namely Sharrock’s uncredited appearance on ‘Yesternow’ for Miles Davis’ A Tribute to Jack Johnson, Vitous’ early fusion-defining tenure with Weather Report, and Marcus’ collaboration with Japanese jazz-rock outfit Jiro Inagaki and Soul Media.

The post Sonny Sharrock, Steve Marcus, Miroslav Vitous, Daniel Humair :: Green Line appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

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On “Sanctuary,” the closing song on Hiss Golden Messenger’s ninth album, Quietly Blowing It, Mike Taylor sings: “Feeling bad, feeling blue, can’t get out of my own mind, but I know how to sing about it.” And thankfully, he does. For over a decade now, Hiss Golden Messenger has provided us with music that heals. Taylor’s songs stress the importance of growth, empathy, and grace, and acknowledge the formative inevitably of pain, weakness, and loss. And despite the self-effacing title and a past eighteen months plus of potent darkness, this new work only strengthens Taylor’s resolve.

The post Hiss Golden Messenger :: Quietly Blowing It appeared first on Aquarium Drunkard.

For more, go to: AquariumDrunkard.com (Source)