iRockNashville

Current track

Title

Artist

PREVIOUSLY PLAYED:
PREVIOUSLY PLAYED:
Background

Music Industry News

Page: 4

best mathcore albums

Although hardcore is often considered a more simplistic style of aggressive music, bands have broken that mold by breeding offshoot subgenres with unique approaches. As the ’90s metallic hardcore movement developed, many took a more technical approach and began experimenting with every piece of their sound, leading to the entire mathcore movement. Like the songs themselves, […]

The post 20 mathcore albums that made the genre what it is today appeared first on Alternative Press.

For more, go to: AltPress.com (Source)

Check out the spell-binding 43-minute collaboration between Quail and Her Name Is Calla’s Tom Morris for Forgotten Futures For more, check out: TeamRock.com (Source)

Christian rockers Stryper recently issued the following announcement: “This Thursday we’ll be releasing an awesome remix of the song ‘To Hell With The Devil’. Our friend Jeff Savage did an amazing remix. We were all blown away and will be releasing it to Patreon only members on 1/21/21…For more, check out: BraveWords.com (Source)

Watch the video for All My Favorite Songs, the first taste of Weezer’s 14th studio album, OK Human For more, check out: TeamRock.com (Source)

In early 2016, Ricardo Escobar (lead guitar) and Antonio Valdés (bass) arrived in Finland, finally realising their dream of moving to Finland to make metal music. By this point they had been working on a band project that would become Ulthima for 6 years, first in Mexico and then a…For more, check out: BraveWords.com (Source)

Foo Fighters, Bruce Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi perform to celebrate the inauguration of the 46th President of the USA For more, check out: TeamRock.com (Source)

Dutch prog rock legends Kayak will release their 18th album Out Of This World in May For more, check out: TeamRock.com (Source)

Former W.A.S.P. guitarist Chris Holmes spoke to SiriusXM‘s “Trunk Nation With Eddie Trunk” about the circumstances that led to his initial departure from the band. Holmes joined W.A.S.P. in 1982 and remained with the group until 1990. In 1996, the guitarist returned to W.A.S.P. and stayed with the band until 2001. Chris has not played with W.A.S.P. since. “You take the first album of W.A.S.P., and it was a group of guys — a group, a band,” Chris said. “And after that, the second album, it wasn’t a group — it was a one-man show. And it’s been a one-man show after that ever since. It’s the way it is. Look at the records. It’s the way it is in that band. “W.A.S.P. never played any shows until I was in the band, so where does a band start — when they record or when they do their first show?” he continued. “I came in before the first show, and it was ‘one for all, all for one.’ But then when money came into it and fame, people changed — they change real bad. And I never changed. I don’t change. I haven’t changed the way I think, the way I am. I’m not gonna change. I am what I am. “During the [making of the] second [album], I was told the manager wants to use Blackie‘s [Lawless, W.A.S.P. frontman] image [on the cover], which the manager didn’t tell me that — Blackie told me that.” According to Chris, he, guitarist Randy Piper, drummer Tony Richards and Blackie were all part of W.A.S.P. initial management contract, but Blackie was the only one signed to the record label. “Everybody thinks we [all] signed to the label, but it wasn’t [like that],” Holmes said. “I never learned about the business till about 10 years ago,” he explained. “How do you learn about the business? You’ve gotta be in there with the manager and all that stuff, so I was always kept from that… I put my trust into somebody, and [I found out later that he was] sticking a knife in my back. I didn’t find that out until 2010 or ’11. “Once [W.A.S.P.] became [all about] one person, [my attitude was] ‘Hey, I’ll just do my thing, and leave me alone. I’ll play my guitar.'” Despite the fact that he only got songwriting credit on a a couple of the songs on each of the first four W.A.S.P. records, Holmes is adamant that his input was essential to the band’s overall sound. “If I would have quit after the first album, the way I play guitar, the way I play is really important to writing those songs,” he said. “If I hadn’t joined in the beginning, it would have never worked. Blackie told me that the first day, when he came and talked to me to play in W.A.S.P. He says, ‘I’ve got this band. It’s not gonna work unless you’re in it.’ He told me that to my face.” Last October, Chris said that he would never consider returning to W.A.S.P. unless Lawless agreed to pay him the publishing royalties that he allegedly owes him. He told Canada’s The Metal Voice: “A lot of people think I made money from W.A.S.P. I’ve never gotten my royalties, or even my songwriting. All the stuff that I wrote, I’ve never gotten paid one penny. And you know whose fault it is? It’s my my fault for not knowing the business, how it is. I trusted somebody. “After every album, when the album is done, how they split up the publishing with the publishing contracts, the publishing companies — that’s where the money comes from,” he continued. “I was never told about when that meeting was. Because the other guys in the band never wrote — I was the only one [other than Blackie]. So I’m the only one that they have to screw over to get all the publishing. So I was never told. Then when I dug into it in about 2006 or [2007], I went into Sanctuary Music, had a lawyer go in to find out where all my publishing is, and I was written in as a session player into all the records. And if you don’t know about it, and you’re not told, and you don’t see, you don’t know. So I trusted Blackie Lawless about that. And when I found out, it really kind of yanked me wrong. It yanks me wrong — it makes me see he was sticking a knife in my back from the first day, from the first album, and not telling me, and being my best friend.” During a November 2017 press conference in Moscow, Russia, Lawless was asked what he would say to those W.A.S.P. fans who continue to call for the band to reunite with Holmes. He responded: “People get divorced for certain reasons, and there’s times when the kids want the parents to get back together, but sometimes it never happens. And this is one of those [times]. Sorry.” The documentary film “Mean Man: The Story Of Chris Holmes”, written and directed by French filmmakers Antoine De Montremy and Laurent Hart, was made available on Blu-ray, DVD and VOD on January 15. The project was born in 2014 after De Montremy and Hart had an opportunity to meet and direct Holmes in a music video for the Holmes-penned song “Let It Roar” in Cannes. At that time, the now-62-year-old rocker had more or less disappeared from the music scene, leaving his home in the U.S. to seek a new beginning with his wife Sarah in France. For more, go to: Blabbermouth.net (Source)

Mike Patton’s art rockers Tomahawk will release new album Tonic Immobility in March For more, check out: TeamRock.com (Source)

Frontiers Music Srl will release “One Shot”, the new solo album from Danish vocalist Ronnie Atkins, album on March 12. The official music video for the disc’s second single, the title track, can be seen below. “To be honest, I initially had no intention to do a solo album to begin with, but for various reasons, and in particularly my own personal health situation, I finally decided to have a crack at it,” says Atkins. “Around Easter 2020, and only some six weeks after I was told that everything seemingly looked very positive for my health, I was, unfortunately, diagnosed with stage 4 cancer and told it was incurable, which was devastating news for me. Needless to say, that was a total game changer and I went into kind of a panic situation for a while. But when the dust had settled, I realized there were two ways to approach the situation. I could sit down, accept the facts, and feel pity for myself or I could pull myself up, set some goals, pursue my dreams, and carry on living. And with fantastic backup from my family and true friends, I went for the latter.” With the global pandemic shutting down touring for the foreseeable future, Atkins knew a tour promoting the latest PRETTY MAIDS album, “Undress Your Madness” (2019), was not going to be in the cards anytime soon. Suddenly, the timing for working on a new solo album seemed to have presented itself. “Well, I couldn’t change the way things were, by any means,” he says. “The whole world was on a lockdown and the future prospects of concerts were very uncertain and still is to this day. Basically, that meant that if I was gonna carry out the idea of a solo album, it had to be now since I don’t necessarily have all the time in the world. I had all these ideas recorded on my iPhone that I felt were too good to never see the light of day and I was writing a lot at the time to help ease my frustrations.” Ronnie‘s next step was to hook up with good friend and PRETTY MAIDS bandmate and producer Chris Laney to begin the work of putting these ideas together into songs. Chris is overseeing production, Jacob Hansen will mix, and musicians/singers appearing on the album include, in addition to Laney, Allan Sørensen, Morten Sandager, Pontus Egberg, Pontus Norgren, Kee Marcello, Olliver Hartmann, John Berg, Anders Ringman, Linnea Vikström Egg and Björn Strid. “Not being able to handle the recordings myself since I’m old school and a complete idiot when it comes to IT, Pro Tools, etc. I hooked up with my PRETTY MAIDS friend and firesoul Chris Laney, who literally cheered me up and convinced me to go ahead with it,” Ronnie says. “So, I decided to get moving and literally recorded my ideas on either piano or guitar and with a mellotron click to keep the beat and the accompanying vocal. Then I would send these along to Chris, who did the instrumentation in Stockholm and would then send back demos to me. Then I recorded the vocals first, which is totally the opposite of what you’d normally do, but based on the uncertainty of my health situation, I wanted to get them down. After that we did the basic tracks, drums, guitars, keys, backing vocals, etc. Odd way of doing it, for me at least, but it worked. And so, this procedure slowly moved on during the summer and finally turned into an album of 12 new songs.” “I wouldn’t have been able to carry out this project without the enthusiasm of Chris, who has been my constant partner in this project from day one,” Atkins adds. “On top of that, I had the pleasure of working with a variety of great musicians/singers such as Pontus Norgren, Kee Marcello, Olliver Hartmann, Pontus Egberg, Linnea Vickström Egg, Björn Strid, and at last, but not at least, my PRETTY MAIDS relatives Allan Sørensen and Morten Sandager. “Musically and lyrically, this album has been a different process for me, considering everything going on. Musically, it could have gone in various directions. It’s always a question of what you want it to be. A good song is a good song, so it’s really a matter of how it is packaged. But I decided to make it appeal to the fans, the supporters who’ve been following me for almost 40 years, so this is basically a melodic rock album with a heavy twist. Lyrically, it also has a different approach. I found it hard to write about sex, drugs, and rock’n’roll, etc. due to the situation I’m wrapped up in, so I guess it turned out a bit more personal and maybe melancholic at times. But it reflects my thoughts at the given time these lyrics were written.” “One Shot” track listing: 01. Real
02. Scorpio
03. One Shot
04. Subjugated
05. Frequency Of Love
06. Before The Rise Of An Empire
07. Miles Away
08. Picture Yourself
09. I Prophesize
10. One By One
11. When Dreams Are Not Enough Lineup: Ronnie Atkins: Lead and backing vocals
Chris Laney: Rhythm guitars, keyboards and backing vocals
Allan Sørensen: Drums
Morten Sandager: Keyboards
Pontus Egberg: Bass Acoustic guitars: Anders Ringman
Lead guitars/solos: Pontus Norgren, Kee Marcello, Olliver Hartmann, John Berg, Chris Laney
Additional backing vocals: Chris Laney, Linnea Vikström Egg, Olliver Hartmann, Björn Strid
Produced by: Chris Laney
Mixed by Jacob Hansen The 56-year-old Atkins was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2019 and underwent at least 33 radiation and four chemotherapy treatments in the fall of that year before being declared cancer-free. In October 2020, he announced that his cancer had returned. Photo credit: Tallee Savage

For more, go to: Blabbermouth.net (Source)