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Bonnie Prince Billy

In 1970, Jerry Garcia co-wrote “Friend Of The Devil” with John Dawson and Robert Hunter. The Grateful Dead included the song on their album American Beauty, and it became a staple for the band. In the past five decades, lots of people have covered “Friend Of The Devil”: Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, Loggins & Messina, Counting Crows, Ministry John Darnielle and Justin Vernon and Megafaun. Now, the LA-based art-pop musician Andrew Rineheart has made his own version of “Friend Of The Devil,” and he’s brought fellow Louisville native Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy in on it.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Ashley Shadow, the moniker of Vancouver-based musician Ashley Webber, has announced the follow-up to her 2016 self-titled debut. It’s called Only The End and it’ll be out in September. For its lead single, “Don’t Slow Me Down,” she got Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy to duet on it with her — she previously appeared on his 2008 album Lie Down in the Light. The song’s dusty and mournful and Webber’s voice quivers as she reflects on the passage of time: “Now moving away and settling down/ Feeling a calm from time going round/ Seeing your life twenty years from now/ Don’t slow me down.” “‘Don’t Slow Me Down’ is a song that fights the enviable experience of falling behind, losing out or having something pass you by,” she said in a statement. Listen to the track below.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

In April, old friends and collaborators Matt Sweeney and Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy finally released their truly stunning collaborative album Superwolves, the 16-years-later sequel to their first LP Superwolf. Today, Sweeney and Bonnie Billy have covered a song from another pair of musicians who come from the same community, the great Louisville Kentucky folk musicians Joan Shelley and Nathan Salsburg. In turn, Shelley and Salsburg have covered the Superwolves duo.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

In the almost 60 years since Bob Dylan released his debut album, countless words have been spilled on his singular legacy. There are books and movies and over half a century’s worth of music journalism trying to dissect the mystery and pin down the multitudes. College courses unpack his lyrics. A Presidential Medal Of Freedom and a Nobel Prize and who knows how many other honors mark Dylan’s towering, seismic presence as not just a musician but a cultural and literary icon of the American Century. All of which is to say: You and I both know about Bob Dylan, and there’s little I could say to celebrate his 80th birthday that hasn’t been said many times before.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

If you’ve read anything about Matt Sweeney and Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s astonishing new album Superwolves — like, say, the rave review and in-depth profile we published at this website — you might have noticed the name David Ferguson. The man otherwise known as “Ferg” has been part of Sweeney and Will Oldham’s circle of collaborators for a while now. They both met him through his work engineering Johnny Cash’s American Recordings series with Rick Rubin; Oldham was called in to advise Cash on how to sing “I See A Darkness,” while Sweeney was tapped to play guitar on some of Cash’s later Rubin collabs. The connection goes back 20 years, but it’s been especially fruitful lately.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

On their first joint album in 16 years, the guitarist and singer invite in new collaborators while preserving their uncanny chemistry For more, check out: RollingStone.com (Source)

You couldn’t fit the Superwolf CD anywhere. Drag City sold Superwolf, the 2005 collaborative album from old buddies Will Oldham and Matt Sweeney, in a large, flat cardboard envelope thing — too big for a CD shelf, too small for a bookshelf, with a weird little cloth thing on the inside to hold the compact disc. In the days when music was still largely collected on physical items, when people would obsessively organize and catalog their collections of those physical items, Superwolf was an anomaly that resisted all attempts to file it. You could do one of two things with Superwolf. You could bury it at the bottom of a box of other things, or you could leave it on top of all your stuff, where you would see it all the time and where you would probably decide to put it on constantly. I chose the latter.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Pete Townsend

Back in February, Will Oldham and Matt Sweeney announced Superwolves, the sequel to their beloved 2005 collab Superwolf. We’ve heard several tracks from it so far, including “Make Worry For Me,” “Hall Of Death,” and “My Blue Suit.” The album arrives this Friday, and ahead of that the duo is back with one more preview.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Jonah Freeman & Justin Lowe

Matt Sweeney and Will Oldham are two of indie music’s greatest collaborators. For proof, just listen through the two 51-year-olds’ recent discographies, the latest chapters in each artist’s decades-long history of playing well with others. In particular, make time for the new album they’re about to release together, as brilliant a collection of songs as any these two have ever worked on.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Over this past pandemic-addled year, Will Oldham — the eccentric Louisville singer-songwriter known as Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy — has continued busily collaborating with his musician friends. He finished up his new Superwolves album with Matt Sweeney. He released a seemingly endless series of covers with fellow Drag City OG Bill Callahan and an assortment of their pals. And it appears he has completed an EP with folk guitarist and archivist Nathan Salsburg and writer Max Porter.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)