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Erlend Øye

Salvo Alibrio

Erlend Øye is enjoying his freedom. He’s spent the last week and a day cooped up inside a quarantine hotel, whiling away the hours in isolation until he can safely join his friends and family. He doesn’t have Covid, fortunately, but he has just returned to his native Norway after more than a year away. “If you’re in Norway and you go out to do a very specific things,” he says, “you have a paper for that and you can do quarantine in your home. But I had been away much longer and I didn’t know what my rights were. So I ended up being sent to this hotel, which was pretty sad and weird. It’s really difficult to be alone for me.” Øye spent his days checking email, playing online chess, taking very long walks, and showering three or four times a day. “Cold, warm, cold, warm. Just to feel something. Oh god, that sounds crazy.”

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Quiet Is The New Loud wasn’t just the name of Kings Of Convenience’s first proper album — it crystalized their vision and aesthetic. The Norwegian duo of Erlend Øye and Eirik Glambek Bøe ushered indie-folk into the 21st century by combining nylon and steel string acoustic guitars, solemn vocals and occasional orchestral flourishes: a solitary trumpet (“Singing Softly To Me”), strident cello (“Failure”), twinkling piano (“Summer On The Westhill”). In the hands of other musicians, this stripped-down approach could sound anemic or twee. However, Quiet Is The New Loud is robust and inviting.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Last year, the German/Norwegian group the Whitest Boy Alive reunited following their break-up in 2014. In March, they put out a new song called “Serious” and they were scheduled to play a handful of festivals this year. Obviously that is no longer happening, but before the pandemic caused shutdowns worldwide, the band’s members landed in…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)