iRockNashville

Current track

Title

Artist

PREVIOUSLY PLAYED:
PREVIOUSLY PLAYED:
Background

Normani

A lifetime ago, before he was a culture war figurehead posing for photos with Elon Musk and Joe Rogan, before he asked Michel Gondry to film his all-star block party, before he helmed his short-lived but generation-defining Comedy Central series, Dave Chappelle and his creative partner Neal Brennan wrote a stoner comedy called Half Baked. Chappelle and SNL actor Jim Breuer were billed as the two leads of Half Baked, but for my money the movie’s most iconic moment belongs to Guillermo Diaz, whose character Scarface memorably quits his fast food job by announcing over the restaurant P.A., “Fuck you! Fuck you! Fuck you! You’re cool. And fuck you, I’m out!” I thought of this scene upon hearing “abcdefu.”

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Charlotte Rutherford

Lil Nas X was going to be a one-hit wonder. This much seemed obvious to me. “Old Town Road” had all the makings of a fleeting career. A half-rap, half-country novelty hit about a lean-drinking cowboy who’ll ride ’til he drops, made viral through savvy promotion on TikTok and Twitter, buoyed by controversy over whether it should qualify for Billboard‘s country charts, then sent into overdrive by a remix featuring the “Achy Breaky Heart” guy — it was more a meme than a song, a joyous joke adults and children alike could be in on. After the track spent a record-breaking 19 weeks at #1 on Billboard‘s Hot 100, its momentum extended by an assortment of star-studded alternate remixes and videos, it also started to seem like an albatross. Despite everything the “Old Town Road” saga said about this guy’s musical and promotional skills, it was hard to imagine where he could possibly go next. But Montero Hill is nothing if not imaginative.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Singer shows off dance moves at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center For more, check out: RollingStone.com (Source)

KueenD went viral after flipping Kstylis’ 2013 single “Booty Me Down.” But by not clearing the sample, her breakthrough moment became a career-stalling ordeal For more, check out: RollingStone.com (Source)

Normani and Cardi B land in the Top Ten with their “Wild Side” collaboration For more, check out: RollingStone.com (Source)

Steve Cannon

It has been less than a year since this website published an article headlined “Meet Australian TikTok Emo-Rapper The Kid Laroi, The Sad-Rap Silverchair.” The idea was that this teenager from Waterloo, Australia represented a tipping point for genre-meltdown emo-rap descended from the likes of XXXTentacion, Lil Peep, and Juice WRLD, the poppier side of the music we used to call SoundCloud rap. (It’s more of a TikTok phenomenon now, but then, isn’t everything?) Laroi, my colleague Tom Breihan argued, was analogous to his fellow Australians Silverchair, the teenage rock band that showed up on MTV a year after Kurt Cobain died, marking the point when grunge had become completely commodified. Tom heard in Laroi’s debut album-or-mitxape-or-whatever Fuck Love the full-on corporatization of this emo-rap wave, but he also heard potential for the project to linger in the top 10 the way releases from numbed, melodic sing-rappers like Lil Baby and Gunna and obvious Laroi predecessor Post Malone do:

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Normani previously made a cameo appearance in Cardi B’s “WAP” video For more, check out: RollingStone.com (Source)

Normani has released a new single, “Wild Side,” which features Cardi B. It comes with a video directed by Tanu Muino and choreographed by Sean Bankhead, who also did the moves for her enduring “Motivation” music video. “I had already been in rehearsal for about three weeks preparing for the video when Cardi heard the record for the first time,” Normani said in a statement. “She really showed up for me and brought this record to life by simply doing what Cardi does best. I love that woman down and I’m forever grateful.”

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Michael Kovac/WireImage

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Changes was a funny name for an album that rarely seemed to change at all. Conceptually, it made some kind of sense: Justin Bieber’s life had transformed in the four and a half years since Purpose, the blockbuster LP that spawned three #1 hits, infused Bieber’s pop-R&B sound with an EDM undercurrent, and completed his…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)