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Rio Da Yung OG

It’s not that hard to get a #1 single right now. I mean, you can’t do it. I can’t do it. But a reasonably famous and popular artist with a smart marketing team can probably do it, if everything lines up right. At this point, the pop charts are oriented around streaming numbers and first-week rushes of interest. If a song has a flashy-enough arrival — if it pairs up a couple of famous artists, or has an eye-catching video or a well-publicized backstory — then that song might make it to #1. 6ix9ine got a #1 single by teaming up with Nicki Minaj and by being the loudest, most obnoxious person in the room. Lil Nas X got a second #1 single by seducing and decapitating Satan in the video. Travis Scott has repeatedly hit #1 through feats of marketing voodoo that I don’t even understand. A lot of the time, these songs debut at #1 and then immediately disappear from the top 10. They don’t necessarily have to be hits. The real question is whether a song can keep the #1 spot for a second week. Polo G did it. Polo G made a hit.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

In the past decade-plus, since Gucci Mane released the 2009 anthem “First Day Out,” the first-day-out rap song has become a hallowed tradition. A rapper gets out of prison and immediately heads to the studio to talk some triumphant shit. The last-day-out rap song is a whole other thing, and that’s what Rio Da Yung OG is giving us today.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

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For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Morgan Freeman. Legend of stage and screen. Owner of one of the greatest contemplative-rumble voices ever captured. Capable of conveying warm, grandfatherly authority even at his grumpiest. Memphis native. Made his Broadway debut alongside Pearl Bailey and Cab Calloway in a 1968 production of Hello, Dolly! Got his start on the kids’ public-TV show The

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

The videos never stop. They’re a constant stream, a deluge. As I’m writing this, the last one was three days ago. Cinematically, that video is nothing much. The imagery is static, even boring. It’s NBA YoungBoy, riding a shopping cart through a supermarket, throwing boxes of Cinnamon Toast Crunch at the camera. It’s NBA YoungBoy,…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Rap music creates cult heroes. It always has, and it always will. That’s inherent in the way rap music works. The rappers who get famous are, by and large, people who came from massively disadvantaged backgrounds, who had to overcome every conceivable odd to find fame. Rap music depends on confidence and bravado, so it’s…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

When Jack Harlow was 12 years old, he decided that he wanted to become the best rapper in the world. He didn’t know how he’d do it, so he went the natural route: He asked his mom what to do. Harlow’s mother had just read Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers, so she told Harlow that he needed…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

The teenager in the fur coat is transcendently, magnificently bored. He does not want to be on this stage, in front of these cameras, rapping with these other rappers. He wants to be anywhere else, doing anything else. His body language screams with apathy. Unlike DaBaby and Megan Thee Stallion, two of the other rising-star…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Sada Baby does not come from a vacuum. This year, nobody in rap music has been bringing me as much joy as the voluminously beaded, imaginatively bloodthirsty Detroit dance machine Sada Baby, a man who has cranked out giddy drug-sales fever dreams at a baffling rate. Right now, Sada Baby is on one of the […]