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Like 85% of 21st century movie characters, Josie And The Pussycats started out as comic book characters. Josie McCoy (first known as Josie Jones, then Josie James) was a teenage girl, part of the Archie Comics universe; she had her own comic beginning in 1963, in which she had typical teenage adventures with two friends, Melody Valentine and Valerie Brown. In 1969, they formed a band. A year later, during the 1970-71 TV season, Hanna-Barbera Studios turned the comic into an animated series. (N.B.: Valerie was the first Black female character in a Saturday morning cartoon show.)

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Most emo isn’t meant to be interesting. Littered with monotonous instrumentals, tired drawls for vocals, and predictably hopeless lyrics, the genre is inherently supposed to evoke as much as it can with this overdone perpetuation of despair. It can be repetitive, and it can be exhausting — it seems like the point of it is to embody the human tendency towards ennui. Citizen’s 2013 debut Youth did this so well that they could never live up to it; the sedated, mid-tempo pace of “Figure You Out” encompasses the dreary disappointment of being hurt by someone you care about, and the dull riffs holding up “How Does It Feel?” capture the sensation of numbness. It’s a record to put on to echo your own emptiness, which seems to be the purpose of a lot of emo records.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Every year, the Grammys find new ways to be bizarre while retaining their essential, unmistakable Grammy-ness. Often, this manifests in the form of strange nominations and facepalm-worthy upsets and collaborative throwback performances pegged to nothing in particular. This year, though, the world thrust the weirdness upon the Recording Academy in the form of a global pandemic, and the Grammys responded by shaking up their telecast in refreshing fashion. The performances were mostly limited to currently relevant music. Given who was nominated, the winners weren’t even all that egregious. It was one of the least objectionable Grammy nights in recent memory, yet that distinctive insufferable quality still faintly haunted the proceedings — nearly four hours of them, and that’s before you factor in all the afternoon festivities.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Kevin Winter/DMI/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images

Popular culture in the ’90s was significantly broader, deeper, and more eclectic than millennial nostalgists demand of it. And yet it’s also the source of such striking works of anti-profundity that it’s enough to make those of us who lived through an era of comparative peace and prosperity want to throw it all in the garbage. We’re talking about the kind of schlock that would eventually get so oppressively thick that the only thing available to counter it would be a ruthless irony so poisonous that it threatened our ability to appreciate anything mass-culture at face value. Maybe that’s an extreme stance to take — not as extreme as the taste of Diet Mountain Dew, but close — and yet that’s the only way I’m really able to get at the brief but staggering moment when multiple multi-billion-dollar entertainment industries went all-in on the last gasp of the big post-“We Are The World” all-star charity single wave.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Jackie Lee Young

When the Grammy nominations came out, there were some surprising names in the Album Of The Year field alongside expected blockbusters from the likes of Taylor Swift, Dua Lipa, and Post Malone. You can always expect a few critically acclaimed underdogs like Haim and Jhené Aiko, but selections like a Coldplay album that was immediately memory-holed upon release or an obscure collection from jazzbo-beloved former YouTube virtuoso Jacob Collier were a stark reminder that Grammy voters live in their own distinct reality. Also, why were Black Pumas nominated for an album that came out before the eligibility window?

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Grimes/Nifty Gateway

The electronic producer 3LAU (pronounced “Blau”) makes bubbly, melodic EDM that packs stadiums; next month, he’s set to headline one of Red Rocks’ first concerts since the massive Colorado venue’s closure due to COVID last year. But despite his outsized fanbase, the 26-year-old musician made headlines last week not for his music, but for its mode of distribution and the enormous payout he received as a result. In one of the first exchanges of its kind, 3LAU “minted,” or released, music on the Ethereum blockchain as a non-fungible token, or NFT.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

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NBC/Getty; Kevin Winter/Getty

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

The professional audio industry spent much of last year pivoting and adapting to the current state of live events. From live-stream concerts to pre-taped performances in artists’ bedrooms, the entire industry was forced to adjust to a new way of working. To bring the industry together, Shure gathered an all-star panel of guests to offer their own perspective on how the current situation has impacted their professional lives and day-to-day reality. The 90-minute roundtable chat offered unique viewpoints from bands, venues, music labels, and more, including Julie Weir (Sony Records UK, Music for Nations), Adam Thurston (Audiotree, Lincoln Hall, Schubas […]

The post Watch: Shure Sounding Board Roundtable appeared first on Music Connection Magazine.

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