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Young Dolph

This week’s big event was supposed to be the release of Kanye West’s Donda — the extremely hyped-up return of rap’s most troubled star, attempting to retake his place at the center of the conversation after years in the TMZ wilderness. For about 45 minutes, Kanye West did retake that spot. He stood alone in the center of a stadium, blasting his just-mixed album to thousands of fans on a soundsystem so shitty that most of them couldn’t make out much beyond pure blare. Then the album didn’t come out, and now West is apparently still living in that Atlanta stadium, tweaking and futzing and maybe still attempting to fix “Wolves.” Perhaps Kanye West stood in the middle of that field and realized that he didn’t like what he was hearing, that his album wasn’t the opus he’d planned. Perhaps, after that delay, Donda will come out next week. Perhaps it’ll never come out. Point is: Turning an album into a major rap event is hard. If you’re making music on a stage that large, you’re disappointing somebody.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Angelo Kritikos

Write what you know, they say. For Demi Lovato, it’s a harrowing prompt. The singer and actor has been through so much trauma in the years since the Disney Channel’s Camp Rock made her a child star in 2008: addiction, depression, disordered eating, self-harm, sexual assault, the psychological burden of fame in the social media era. Three years ago, after a decade in the spotlight, it all culminated in an overdose that brought her to the brink of death. It would be all but impossible for Lovato to ignore all this on her first album since the overdose. Instead, on these new songs she dives straight into her messy circumstances and attempts to plot a course toward a better future.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Alexander Richter

You knew. As soon as those fucking disgusting chopped-off bloody pig heads showed up in your timeline, you knew. Less than a month ago, the announcement arrived up on Twitter: a title, a release date, those pig heads, “an album by Armand Hammer & The Alchemist.” No tracklist. No advance music. All that came later, but none of it was needed. All you really needed was “an album by Armand Hammer & The Alchemist.” This was going to be special. And it is special. Haram is here now, and it’s everything those pig heads promised.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

In 2018, DJ Muggs went to Egypt. Muggs was the longtime production mastermind behind Cypress Hill, but in their later years, Cypress Hill had moved away from Muggs’ musical blueprint. They’d gone hit-chasing. Cypress Hill’s previous album, 2010’s Rise Up, had a single with Pitbull and Marc Anthony, and it also had songs with guys from Linkin Park and System Of A Down. The record didn’t work, so when Cypress Hill made the follow-up album, B-Real and Sen Dog went to Muggs and gave him total musical control over the album. Muggs took it.

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Al Pereira/Getty Images/Michael Ochs Archives

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

In June of 2020, the American Association of Independent Music (A2IM) partnered with Billboard to expand the parameters for the Top Independent Albums chart, allowing more independently-owned labels to appear on the ranking. Now A2IM is congratulating some of the first independent artists and labels to top the chart, honoring them with the A2IM Independent #1 Award. Recipients of the A2IM Independent #1 Award include Bad Bunny (YHLQMDLG; Rimas), Brandy (b7; Brand Nu Ent./eOne), Eslabon Armado (Vibras de Noche; Del Records), Morgan Wallen (If I Know Me; Big Loud Records), and Young Dolph (Rich Slave; Paper Route EMPIRE). Starting with the Billboard chart dated July 18, all independently-owned labels that control their […]

The post A2IM Honorees at Independent #1 Awards appeared first on Music Connection Magazine.

For more, check out MusicConnection.com (Source)

She made hits. That was the whole premise of Katy Perry — that and stirring up controversy in ways that often sent palms flying toward foreheads. At the peak of her commercial dominance, Perry presented a playful, colorful, hyper-stylized version of pop at its most plastic. A former Christian pop singer whose breakthrough single proclaimed…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)

Rap music creates cult heroes. It always has, and it always will. That’s inherent in the way rap music works. The rappers who get famous are, by and large, people who came from massively disadvantaged backgrounds, who had to overcome every conceivable odd to find fame. Rap music depends on confidence and bravado, so it’s…

For more, go to: Stereogum.com (Source)